What Not To Do While On Workers' Comp

At some point during your workers’ comp claim, there is a fair chance that adjusters will hire an investigator to double check if your injury is genuine. In order to retain the workers’ compensation benefits to which you are entitled, this blog post provides a list of things you should NOT DO.

Before we forget, though, it’s important to remember that you should also read up on the work comp laws related to your specific state, because these laws usually vary for each of the fifty states.

 

Mistake #1: Failure to properly report your accident to your employer (and to do so on time!)

Were you injured on the job and have not reported it to your employer? If so, stop reading right now and report it immediately! Most states provide that an employee has to report the work injury within 30 days to qualify for work comp benefits. That’s a generous window but it would really help your case if you actually report it immediately, or at the latest, within 24-48 hours of your work injury.

And we’re not even talking about just verbally telling your boss or your HR department about the accident. You must ensure that a First Report of Injury is filed. It’s quite common for injured workers to overlook this and it has caused major problems. One of the best reasons is that the longer you delay in letting your employer know about your injury, the more likely they will become suspicious.

Mistake #2: Failure to inform your work comp doctor about the details of your injury

Tell your doctor everything you can about the details of the injury you suffered from your accident at work. When the work comp doctor asks “how are you?” don’t respond with “I’m okay” or “fine.” Be aware that it’s not simply about exchanging pleasantries but rather he/she is actually asking from a medical perspective.

Recall as best you can exactly what happened and be absolutely honest about your symptoms or injuries and any changes related to it, no matter how minor you think they are. Don’t skip any details - be sure to provide a thorough and accurate medical history. A lot of patients think that pre-existing conditions may discredit their claim, but being genuine and sticking to the facts lends integrity to you and your case.

The point is, if you are not feeling better, let your doctor know. Don’t downplay your injury or put off medical treatment either. The insurance company or your employer will think your injury is not as serious as it is. Furthermore, if your injury is getting worse, no need to exaggerate (more on this below). Just be honest and straightforward about the entire thing.

Mistake #3: Faking your injury or symptom/s

Yes, it can be tempting to exaggerate your injury or symptoms in an attempt to strengthen your work comp injury claim - but DON’T DO IT! If your employer, doctor, or adjuster finds out it may mean the end of your work comp case.

Always remember that work comp doctors will perform several tests to examine your injuries and they will definitely know whether you’re exaggerating or not. Worse, you will potentially destroy your medical record by being labeled as a ‘malingerer’ which means someone who fakes or exaggerates injuries.

This essentially not only weakens your claim but you may create cause to dismiss it altogether. Bear in mind that insurance fraud is illegal in all 50 states.

Mistake #4: Not selecting your own doctor

Choice is a fundamental right and, depending on the state, that includes choosing the doctor who will treat your work injury. This is a common mistake especially in large companies where there are staff doctors or those on retainer for work-related injuries. While it may be well-meaning, it’s imperative that you select a doctor that you know and trust will help you get back to work. You must know that neither your employer nor their insurance company can force you to go to a specific doctor of their choosing.

If you’re choosing your own doctor, though, make sure they are certified to handle work comp cases. There are websites such as Workers-Compensation-Doctors that are 100% devoted to listing doctors qualified to work in this area of practice.

Mistake #5: Not heeding your doctor’s advice or treatment plans

A lot of patients tend to think of treatment to be like aspirin - take one or two and you'll be better. That’s a big no-no that can totally diminish your work comp claim.

To put it simply, follow your doctor’s advice. If your doctor requires you to undergo therapy or do follow-up tests, it is imperative that you comply even if you think you are feeling better. It is also quite normal to feel better during treatment but your injuries or symptoms may return or even worsen once treatment is discontinued.

If you wrongfully assume and end up discontinuing care, your employer or the insurance company might think that you did not need to file a work comp claim in the first place making it easy for them to argue that your injuries are not as bad as you made it out to be.

Mistake #7: Failure to return to work when cleared for light-duty work

Your treating doctor may allow you to return to light-duty work. If so, it would be best to follow that advice. Failure to do so will make your employer think you simply do not want to get back to work.

However, if you have any concerns or if you think you cannot perform any of the duties being asked of you, discuss it with your doctor. If your doctor still feels otherwise and sends you back to work, do so but document any discomfort, pain, or other symptoms that arise so they can make adjustments to your duties as necessary.

Mistake #8: Going beyond your doctor’s restrictions (and getting caught doing it)

Patients sometimes tend to think they are actually feeling better even when they’re not. In such cases, they become tempted to do more than the doctor allows them to. And it’s not necessarily limited to when you’re inside the workplace.

It could be menial tasks such as carrying a heavy bag of groceries, picking up a heavy package you just received, over-exerting your body to get something for your top shelf, etc. If your doctor hasn’t given you clearance, wait for necessary help. Those who are living alone are always encouraged to seek a friend or a relative’s assistance to look after them while recovering to their pre-injured state.

What’s worse is that if you get caught in the act of picking up a heavy package by an overzealous insurance adjuster or you overexerted your injured limb by getting an item from the warehouse and forgot about the CCTV camera at the end of the aisle - they may sound extreme but these rare instances may end up discrediting your work comp claim altogether.

Mistake #9: Issuing a recorded statement or signing a medical authorization for the insurance company

Insurance companies may ask you to sign a medical authorization or give a recorded statement. Don’t do it. In fact, patients are not required to do any of those even if the insurance company tells you they can’t proceed with your work comp claim unless you sign certain paperwork.

You may hear all kinds of reasons such as “it is part of our procedures,” or “your employer requires your signature before you get paid,” or “we need your recorded statement to push through with the claim.”

Just know this: there is no state rule or law that requires you to sign a medical authorization or give a recorded statement. While it may in fact be the insurance company’s policy or procedure, that does not necessarily mean you must do so.

The workers’ compensation system is full of obstacles and pitfalls and has caused patients to become frustrated, intimidated, or just plainly unsure of what to do - more so when the insurance company accuses you of workers’ compensation fraud. Remember that it is part of insurance companies’ jobs to look for loopholes in your case in order to deny your claim. Therefore, it is important to follow the tips mentioned above so as to avoid any hiccups in your work comp claim.

About Workers-Compensation-Doctors.com

Workers-Compensation-Doctors​ ​is​ ​the​ ​go-to directory that’s 100%​ ​devoted​ ​to​ ​listing​ ​the best ​Work​ ​Comp​ ​Doctors​ ​in​ ​one​ ​place.​ You can choose Work Comp Doctors according to specialty, location, and services from an IME in the East coast to an orthopedic surgeon in the West. We guarantee that ALL doctors listed in our directories accept Work Comp cases. This website will be your favorite tool to help you find the right specialist related to your workplace injury. Workers-Compensation-Doctors.com will connect you with the doctor YOU need.

Ever wondered if workers’ comp insurance pays for a doctor’s visit? Well here’s the short answer: YES. Let’s take a look at some of the details.

who pays for work comp doctor's visit

First off, what does work comp insurance actually cover?

If an employee suffers a work-related injury or sickness, work comp benefits are mandated to cover the following:

If an employee gets sick or injured at work, workers’ comp benefits pay for medical expenses related to the resulting injury. Those expenses include doctors’ visits, medical tests (e.g. x-rays, blood tests), rehabilitation, emergency room care, hospital stays, and in some cases, even transportation costs.

These same benefits are revoked once it is proven that a worker's injury or illness were obtained outside of work. The same goes for any accidents occurring as a result of intoxication, or worse, if employees were found to have intentionally caused the injury themselves.

In a normal setting, however, it’s important to keep in mind that regulations and guidelines for approval of medical expenses in relation to a work comp claim varies from state to state. But in a general sense, all states’ work comp programs pay for every injured workers’ doctor visits but it’s not without its limitations.

Is there a limitation to the number of times a patient can visit the work comp doctor?

States have certain statutory limits for the different forms of treatment injured workers receive - doctors’ visits included. The point is, there is no fixed number of visits to which a patient can actually ‘use up’.

The main idea is that the workers’ compensation system will pay for an injured worker’s doctor visit as long as it is still necessary for their case. The same goes for treatments that require multiple sessions, such as physical therapy. In most states, additional sessions will also be paid by the work comp system if the doctor deems that further treatment would be beneficial to the injured worker.

Alternatively, the employer may also disagree and seek a second opinion to assess whether said additional treatment would really improve your condition. While the patient may not agree, it is well within their rights to do so and injured workers must comply otherwise your work comp benefits will likely be suspended.

What treatments are NOT covered by work comp benefits?

Any standard treatment will most likely be covered by an injured worker’s work comp benefits. But alternative treatments such as oriental medicine (e.g. acupuncture), naturopathy, Ayurveda, etc. or experimental treatments are usually not part of the coverage, although it can depend on state guidelines. Nevertheless, these types of treatments are allowed as long as the injured worker is able to pay for it out of his/her own pockets.

So who exactly pays for my doctors’ visits?

Ultimately, the onus of paying for an injured worker’s doctors’ visits (or any medical expenses, treatments, etc.) falls on the employer.

Regardless of the state, it is the employers who pay for workers’ compensation insurance. Employers may purchase this coverage through two types of recognized entities namely (1) state-run insurance programs and; (2) private insurance companies. It differs from health insurance in such a way that work comp insurance is not deducted from employee payroll.

If, for instance, an employee’s work comp claim is denied, he/she can pay for his/her own bills and seek reimbursement from the insurer once the denial is reversed on appeal. Alternatively, there are work comp doctors who might agree to treat patients on a lien basis. It means that any bills incurred will come out of recovery acquired through workers’ compensation.

On the other hand, there are states that offer a temporary disability insurance program where injured workers may be eligible to apply in order to cover up some out-of-pocket expenses.

When will the bills be paid?

Any open work comp claim should have the bills shouldered immediately by the insurance company whether it’s private or state-run. The same bills will continue to be paid as long as the patient continues to receive treatment and the claim is still open.

Need a workers’ compensation doctor?

Are you looking for a doctor who accepts workers’ compensation cases? You have come to the right place. Browse from thousands of workers’ compensation doctors here. Workers-Compensation-Doctors.com is the only national directory 100% dedicated to listing workers’ compensation doctors across all 50 states. Our website is trusted by thousands of Adjusters, Nurse Case Managers, Attorneys and Patients to find the work comp doctors they need.

The state requires employers to provide a reasonably safe and healthy work environment for every employee. Of course this is not a fail-safe system and sometimes a work injury will still happen despite employers’ best efforts. It could be a broken bone, a back injury, an occupational illness, psychological injury, or even the aggravation of a pre-existing condition. If you have been injured at work, then you may be wondering what you should do. In this blog post, we’ll provide some guidance for injured workers, including:

What are my rights as an injured worker?

First off, you must report your injury to your employer. If you are able, you must get in touch with your immediate supervisor or the HR manager in the soonest possible time - this is the easiest and most important way to protect your legal rights. This is because most states require that you notify your employer regarding your injury within a given time frame which is typically the same day or within a few days of the incident.

work injury worker fell off a ladder

This is because states also require employers to report any work-related injury as soon as possible (via phone or email). For instance, the state of California (per the California Code of Regulations; Title 8, Section 342) requires employers to report the incident no longer than 8 hours (or no longer than 24 hours as long as the employer can demonstrate that pressing circumstances exist).

In contrast, the state of Florida provides that you must report your work-related injury immediately or no longer than thirty (30) days. The point is, we must note that the threshold varies from state to state.

How can I protect my rights?

It is important to understand that workers’ compensation laws vary from state to state. Albeit in a general sense there are a few legal rights that are common across most states which includes:

Understanding your right to act is just as important as understanding your right to refuse offers or requests. This means that you have the right to refuse any form of settlement made by your employer. Or in some cases, if your employer coerces you to use your personal health insurance to fund your medical treatment, you have all the means to say no.

It is quite common for employees to worry about how making a claim affects their job. In some cases, you may be placed under pressure by your employer not to pursue a claim for personal injury compensation.

Your employer might offer you some form of incentive meant to dissuade you from filing that workers’ compensation claim, you have the right to simply say no. More so if you feel that your boss is taking extraordinary measures (e.g. coercion) to make you do otherwise.

Employers have no right whatsoever to prevent an employee from pursuing a claim stemming from work-related injuries. State laws provide that employees can pursue workers’ compensation claims without fear of reprisal or harassment from your employer. If your employer, manager, or supervisor makes it difficult for you to exercise these rights, they will face severe consequences.

The decision whether or not to pursue a claim rests on YOU. In some cases, an employee may just suffer a minor injury that does not cause long-term problems, allows one to work normally therefore does not incur lost wages - you may well decide not to pursue a claim. However, if the injuries are more serious resulting in an inability to work, a claim for compensation is clearly in order and is a right afforded to everyone.

What if my injury was not my employer’s fault?

There are cases wherein an injury is caused by a third party. For example, this third party may be an erring delivery truck driver or faulty equipment design that led to your injury. So you ask, “what are my rights against parties other than my employer?”

work injury third party

If the injury was caused by another party, you have a right to file a claim against that person or company - these are called “third party claims.” However, these claims are not filed in workers’ compensation courts but rather take the form of civil lawsuits filed in state or federal courts.

Work-related injury civil lawsuits differ from workers’ compensation claim because you can seek additional personal injury damages from the latter. A workers’ compensation claim is intended to reimburse you for lost wages and medical expenses - not non-economic damages which, in layman’s terms, mean seeking compensation for the “pain and suffering” the resulting injury from third party claims have caused.

Which workers’ compensation doctor should I choose?

We must remember that the ability to choose a workers’ compensation doctor for treating your work-related injury depends on the state where you claim is filed.

choosing the right wc doctor

Some states require an injured employee to be seen by a doctor chosen by the employer or the work comp insurance carrier. Meanwhile, other states allow injured workers to choose any doctor within a given network whereas the admission to the network is determined by the state, the employer, or the employer’s insurance company. There are also cases whether you can choose a work comp doctor for the initial treatment visit as compared to the continuing treatment for your workers’ compensation injury. Read a full list of states and who chooses the doctor in each state.

Not all physicians treat injured workers. There are rules in place for workers’ compensation cases, which is why a doctor you prefer may not necessarily treat injured workers.

Delaware, Oregon, and New York are examples of states that allow injured workers the right to choose his/her own treating doctor, provided the employer does not have a provider plan or managed care arrangement. It is commonplace for injured workers to choose from a list of state-approved doctors or health care providers for treating work-related injuries.

The most important thing here is to exercise due diligence in order to find the best workers’ compensation doctor to treat your injury, even if you are provided a list of physicians. Here’s some criteria to help you consider whether the doctor is the one for you:

It’s also critical to understand the role your doctor plays in this entire endeavor. He/she is not only responsible for treating your work injury but he is also able to sanction paid time off or mandate any physical work restrictions you should have.

At the end of the day, choosing a doctor you feel that you can trust is key. If you need help finding one, you may confer with your workers’ comp lawyer for recommendations or you can start browsing our national directory of workers’ compensation doctors here.

Are workers’ compensation doctors free?

Technically speaking, workers’ compensation doctors are not free. They are, in essence, paid by employers or the state. This is not done directly, however, as these are often done through the state government, an insurance company, the employer (self-insurance), or a third party administrator.

State-run Insurance Programs

Smaller employers or those that have a low rate of work-related injuries use this program. These programs are administered by the departments of labor, industrial relations, or commerce. What happens is employers pay a premium to these state-run programs and when a claim arises, the department that oversees the program handles the payment which is taken care of by the government.

Private Insurance Companies

Utilizing private insurance companies is also an option employers choose. Oftentimes, larger insurance companies have a wide range of plans available for employers regardless of scale. Any workers’ compensation claim, complaints, or issues with regards to payment would be coursed through these companies.

Self-Insurance

This type of program is often adopted by larger corporations (more in a scale of Coca-Cola, Chevron, etc.) whereas they should be big enough to have assets to ensure coverage of any workers’ compensation payouts. The state then adapts an oversight function to ensure that all necessary payments are made. Employers who self-insure generally use a third-party administrator who takes care of all the administrative work.

But to put in simpler terms, you do not have to pay anything to a workers’ compensation doctor because your employer or the state ultimately takes care of it for you.

How can I schedule an appointment with a workers’ compensation doctor?

Scheduling an appointment with a workers’ compensation doctor can be done by finding a work comp doctor on our workers’ compensation doctor directory where you can then schedule a face-to-face or telemedicine appointment.

We all knew that one day telemedicine for work injuries would become more common. What we didn't know is that it would be so soon. With the arrival of COVID-19, and the subsequent lockdown, telemedicine has never been as popular as it is today. This is, in part, also thanks to a relaxing of regulations by the AMA, allowing doctors to use any software and treat patients online in any state. This applies not only  to regular healthcare appointments, but also for workers' compensation appointments. But, for many patients, all this change can be confusing. Whey are not sure about how to schedule a telemedicine appointment for a work injury, who pays for it, how much it costs, what happens if surgery is required, among many other questions. This page aims to answer some of these questions.

Can work injuries be treated via telemedicine?

Yes, certain work injuries can be treated via telemedicine. Of course, this does not apply to all injuries, for example those requiring emergency medical treatment or surgery. However, for many non-emergency work-related injuries, telemedicine appointments can be conducted online.

telemedicine for work injuries

How can I schedule a telemedicine appointment for a work related injury?

If you would like to schedule a telemedicine appointment for a work injury, you can do so at Workers-Compensation-Doctors.com. For doctors who accept telemedicine appointments, there is a separate button on their profile, allowing you to schedule an appointment online, instead of an in-office visit.

How much do workers' compensation telemedicine appointments cost?

The cost of a telemedicine appointment will depend on the doctor's office. The fee, however, is usually paid for by the insurance carrier or employer.

What if I need surgery for a work injury?

Of course, if surgery is required, then this cannot be done online! A separate, in-office appointment will need to be scheduled. Your doctor or surgeon will be able to provide you with more specific information.

Related Posts

Workers' Compensation - Who chooses the doctor?

The short answer is: It depends on the state. In some states, the direction of care within workers' compensation is controlled by the employer or their insurance carrier, while in other states it is controlled by the injured worker. To complicate matters further, certain states offer a blend, whereby the control is divided between both the employer and the injured worker.

Because each state is different, it can be very confusing for not just patients, but also doctors. The purpose of this post is to provide a state-by-state overview of the direction of care of work comp cases (and the implications for doctors) for each state.

Injured employee visiting lawyer

Alabama

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Alabama?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Alabama, the Doctor is usually chosen by the employer or insurance carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Alabama

For further information about the Work Comp system in Alabama, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers compensation doctor in Alabama

Alaska

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Alaska?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Alaska, the Doctor is usually chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Alaska

For further information about the Work Comp system in Alaska, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Alaska (1)

Arizona

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Arizona?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Arizona, the Doctor is usually chosen by the injured worker, except in the case of self-insured employers who can control direction of care.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Arizona

For further information about the Work Comp system in Arizona, the following links may be helpful:


Arkansas

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Arkansas?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Arkansas, the Doctor is usually chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Arkansas

For further information about the Work Comp system in Arkansas, the following links may be helpful:


California

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in California?

For Workers' Compensation cases in California, the Doctor is usually chosen by the injured worker, BUT they must choose from a Doctor listed on their employer's Medical Provider Network (MPN).

Further information about Workers' Compensation in California

For further information about the Work Comp system in California, the following links may be helpful:


Colorado

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Colorado?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Colorado, the Doctor is usually chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Colorado

For further information about the Work Comp system in Colorado, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Colorado

Connecticut

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Connecticut?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Connecticut, the Doctor for the initial treatment is chosen by the employer or carrier, but all subsequent doctors can be chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Connecticut

For further information about the Work Comp system in Connecticut, the following links may be helpful:


Delaware

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Delaware?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Delaware, the Doctor for the initial treatment is chosen by the employer or carrier, but the injured worker may simultaneously see a separate doctor of their own choice.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Delaware

For further information about the Work Comp system in Delaware, the following links may be helpful:


Florida

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Florida?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Florida, the Doctor for is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Florida

For further information about the Work Comp system in Florida, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Florida

Georgia

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Georgia?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Georgia, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but their choice is restricted to one of six Doctors provided to them by their employer.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Georgia

For further information about the Work Comp system in Georgia, the following links may be helpful:


Hawaii

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Hawaii?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Hawaii, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Hawaii

For further information about the Work Comp system in Hawaii, the following links may be helpful:


Idaho

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Idaho?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Idaho, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Idaho

For further information about the Work Comp system in Idaho, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Idaho

Illinois

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Illinois?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Illinois, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but if the employer has a Preferred Provider Network, then the injured worker must choose the doctor from this list.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Illinois

For further information about the Work Comp system in Illinois, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Illinois

Indiana

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Indiana?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Illinois, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Indiana

For further information about the Work Comp system in Indiana, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Indiana

Iowa

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Iowa?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Iowa, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Iowa

For further information about the Work Comp system in Indiana, the following links may be helpful:


Kansas

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Kansas?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Kansas, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Kansas

For further information about the Work Comp system in Kansas, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Kansas

Kentucky

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Kentucky?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Kentucky, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Kentucky

For further information about the Work Comp system in Kentucky, the following links may be helpful:


Louisiana

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Louisiana?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Louisiana, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Louisiana

For further information about the Work Comp system in Louisiana, the following links may be helpful:


Maine

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Maine?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Maine, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, however Doctors for the first 10 days of treatment are selected by the employer.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Maine

For further information about the Work Comp system in Maine, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Maine

Maryland

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Maryland?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Maryland, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Maryland

For further information about the Work Comp system in Maryland, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Maryland

Massachusetts

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Massachusetts?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Massachusetts, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Massachusetts

For further information about the Work Comp system in Massachusetts, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Massachusetts

Michigan

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Michigan?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Michigan, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, however for the first 28 days of treatment doctors are selected by the employer.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Michigan

For further information about the Work Comp system in Michigan, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Michigan

Minnesota

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Minnesota?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Minnesota, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but if the employer is part of a managed care plan, then the injured worker should select a doctor from this list, unless the doctor has previously treated the employee.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Minnesota

For further information about the Work Comp system in Minnesota, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Michigan

Mississippi

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Mississippi?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Mississippi, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Mississippi

For further information about the Work Comp system in Mississippi, the following links may be helpful:


Missouri

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Missouri?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Missouri, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Missouri

For further information about the Work Comp system in Missouri, the following links may be helpful:


Montana

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Montana?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Montana the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Montana

For further information about the Work Comp system in Montana, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Montana

Nebraska

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Nebraska?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Nebraska, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier, however injured workers are entitled to choose their own doctor who has previously treated them or their family.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Nebraska

For further information about the Work Comp system in Nebraska, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Nebraska

Nevada

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Nevada?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Nevada, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but they must choose from a list of doctors who have been certified by the state.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Nevada

For further information about the Work Comp system in Nebraska, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Nevada

New Hampshire

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in New Hampshire?

For Workers' Compensation cases in New Hampshire, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but if their employer has a managed care plan, then they must choose a doctor from the plan.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in New Hampshire.

For further information about the Work Comp system in New Hampshire, the following links may be helpful:


New Jersey

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in New Jersey?

For Workers' Compensation cases in New Jersey, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in New Jersey.

For further information about the Work Comp system in New Jersey, the following links may be helpful:


New Mexico

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in New Mexico?

For Workers' Compensation cases in New Mexico, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in New Mexico.

For further information about the Work Comp system in New Mexico, the following links may be helpful:


New York

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in New York?

For Workers' Compensation cases in New York, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but they must choose a doctor from a list of doctors certified by the state.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in New York

For further information about the Work Comp system in New York, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in New York

North Carolina

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in North Carolina?

For Workers' Compensation cases in North Carolina, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in North Carolina

For further information about the Work Comp system in North Carolina, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in North Carolina

North Dakota

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in North Dakota?

For Workers' Compensation cases in North Dakota, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but the employer chooses the doctor for the first 30 days..

Further information about Workers' Compensation in North Dakota

For further information about the Work Comp system in North Dakota, the following links may be helpful:


Ohio

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in North Dakota?

For Workers' Compensation cases in North Dakota, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but they must choose from a list of doctors certified by the state.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in North Dakota

For further information about the Work Comp system in North Dakota, the following links may be helpful:


Oklahoma

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Oklahoma?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Oklahoma, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Oklahoma

For further information about the Work Comp system in Oklahoma, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Oklahoma

Oregon

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Oregon?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Oregon, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but if the employer is part of a managed care plan, then the injured worker must choose a doctor from this plan, unless the doctor has previously treated them.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Oregon

For further information about the Work Comp system in Oregon, the following links may be helpful:


Pennsylvania

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Pennsylvania?

For Workers' Compensation cases in Pennsylvania, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker, but only after the first 90 days. Prior to that it is the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Pennsylvania

For further information about the Work Comp system in Pennsylvania, the following links may be helpful:


Rhode Island

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Rhode Island

For Workers' Compensation cases in Rhode Island, the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Rhode Island

For further information about the Work Comp system in Rhode Island, the following links may be helpful:


South Carolina

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in South Carolina

For Workers' Compensation cases in South Carolina, the Doctor is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in South Carolina

For further information about the Work Comp system in South Carolina, the following links may be helpful:


South Dakota

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in South Dakota

For Workers' Compensation cases in South Dakota the Doctor is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in South Dakota

For further information about the Work Comp system in South Dakota, the following links may be helpful:


Tennessee

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Tennessee

For Workers' Compensation cases in Tennessee, the Doctor is chosen is chosen by the injured worker, but from a panel of only 3 doctors (which are chosen by the employer).

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Tennessee

For further information about the Work Comp system in Tennessee, the following links may be helpful:


Texas

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Texas

For Workers' Compensation cases in Texas, the Doctor is chosen is chosen by the injured worker, but they must choose them from a list of doctors certified by the state.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Texas

For further information about the Work Comp system in Texas, the following links may be helpful:


Utah

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Utah

For Workers' Compensation cases in Utah, the Doctor is chosen is chosen by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Utah

For further information about the Work Comp system in Utah, the following links may be helpful:


Vermont

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Vermont

For Workers' Compensation cases in Vermont, the Doctor is chosen is chosen by the injured worker, however the first visit is a doctor selected by the employer.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Vermont

For further information about the Work Comp system in Vermont, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Vermont

Virginia

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Virginia

For Workers' Compensation cases in Virginia, the Doctor is chosen is chosen by the injured worker, but they must select them from a panel provided by the employer.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Virginia

For further information about the Work Comp system in Virginia, the following links may be helpful:


Who chooses the Workers' Compensation Doctor in Virginia

Washington

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Washington

For Workers' Compensation cases in Washington, the Doctor is chosen is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Washington

For further information about the Work Comp system in Washington, the following links may be helpful:


West Virginia

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in West Virginia

For Workers' Compensation cases in West Virginia, the Doctor is chosen is chosen by the injured worker, but from a list provided by the employer or carrier.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in West Virginia

For further information about the Work Comp system in West Virginia, the following links may be helpful:


Wisconsin

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Wisconsin

For Workers' Compensation cases in Wisconsin, the Doctor is chosen is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Wisconsin

For further information about the Work Comp system in Wisconsin, the following links may be helpful:


Wyoming

Who chooses the Doctor in a Workers' Compensation case in Wyoming

For Workers' Compensation cases in Wyoming, the Doctor is chosen is chosen by the injured worker.

Further information about Workers' Compensation in Wyoming

For further information about the Work Comp system in Wyoming, the following links may be helpful:


About Workers-Compensation-Doctors.com

Workers-Compensation-Doctors.com is a National Directory listing Doctors who accept Workman's Compensation patients.

The directory is used by Work Comp Adjusters, Nurse Case Managers, Attorneys, and Patients who are looking for Work Comp doctors.

If  you are a Doctor, you may be interested in listing yourself in the directory or Workers' Compensation Marketing.

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